Month: March 2016

6

Daily life in Maine

Posted on by

As we set out on this journey almost three months ago, many people expressed how much, they too, would like to have the opportunity to travel and relax. So we thought we should take a moment to clear up a few misconceptions. Our pictures and posts, of course, are all about the good food, beautiful scenery and wonderful experiences we are having. But what you see are just the highlights. In between those times there are hours of hard work.  Amber spends her time, often simultaneously, identifying our next local adventure, researching international locations, analyzing travel details, cataloging renown eating establishments to visit, and finding new and tasty foods to create in the kitchen.DSC_0546 Continue reading →

4

The Nature of Things in Maine

Posted on by

The weather of late has been a mixed bag of rain, gray, wind, gray, clouds, gray, sleet, gray, and then suddenly a day of sun! Amber has been compiling a list of things we want to see and do in the area so when we get a sunny day we can jump in the car and head out to take pictures in good lighting. Maine is home to about 70 lighthouses and we have visited at least five so far. The Owls Head Lighthouse was constructed in 1852 and manned until it was automated in 1989. It is still a working lighthouse today and the keepers house is home to the American Lighthouse Foundation, Interpretive Center & Gift Shop. This was the first Maine lighthouse we were able to actually spend much time walking around – our previous visits, it was just too dang cold!DSC_0484 Whether you are looking out over the Pacific or Atlantic, a lighthouse is an enchanted place. Just stepping on to the grounds you feel a sense of history, purpose, substance and resolution. Lighthouses are built to withstand the absolute extreme of weather an ocean can conjure – and do it perched, purposely, atop the most exposed location their builders can secure. Because of this, a lighthouse generates much more than light waves in the visible spectrum. Their combination of hardy build, exposed location, gravity of mission, history, and pristine condition, cause a lighthouse to generate veneration as well. I always feel a sense of reverence when visiting a lighthouse.
Continue reading →

13

Hussey and Kraut

Posted on by

DSC_0323Amber and I have seen so much of this amazing area lately it has been hard to keep up! But now that we have found our Moxie we have the energy to do some more sharing. There is so much beauty and variety and richness to life here it is difficult to explain. One of the mottos we see often is – “Maine, the way life should be” – I really get this. And it seems like the people that live here get it too. We have chatted with so many Mainers like the lovely couple who own the Airbnb right next to Fort Edgecomb that were so happy to take the time to fill us in on some history. Everyone  seems to genuinely appreciate the life they have here and take a lot of pride in their community and history. Those of you from Maine that have been replying – we just can’t thank you enough! Amber is filling up our outing schedule with your “must see” recommendations and we really appreciate your explanations of mysteries – we now know how to use the “L” to access our bighouse-littlehouse-backhouse-barn and that the roads are crowned high to deal with the wicked rain!
DSC_0243 (3)
We see a lot of boats here of course. This boat owner is going to be upset when he gets home to find he left the water running.
We visited the state capital, Augusta, just long enough to capture a picture of Amber doing her best Statue of Liberty impression.
DSC_0307

Continue reading →

6

We’re Trying Maine’s Official Soft Drink – Moxie!

Posted on by

With our time in Maine, we are trying to experience as much as possible. We’ve tried lobster rolls and whoopie pies and tonight we are trying Moxie. It’s been around since the late 1800’s and was named Maine’s official soft drink – Moxie.

Continue reading →

24

Maine Observations

Posted on by

We have been traveling around mid coast Maine long enough now to get a sense for some of the differences between the northeastern most state and the northwest. Some things make sense, like the fact there are lobster places everywhere and you watch the sun rise out of the ocean rather than watch it set. But some things are just mysteries. One of the first things you notice is the difference in houses. There are a lot of these stately looking ones that have been well maintained since they were built one or two hundred years ago.DSC_0026Then there are these straight wall, no eve, shingle sided places absolutely everywhere! When you consider how much rain and snow these structures are subjected to and the fact that humans have been contending with weather here for hundreds of years it is hard to understand why there appears to be zero thought put into roof lines, eves, or where the snow will dump.DSC_0407
And there are lots of these places that look like they had a house and they had a garage and decided one day  they would just build a little piece of house in between to connect them because they got tired of the Maine weather on the way out to the car.
DSC_0421 (1) DSC_0427 (1) Continue reading →